Match.com is a Front for Scammers Using AI and Harvested Social Media Data

in scam •  last year  (edited)

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If you thought the Nigerian Prince scam was bad, you haven't seen anything yet.

An undercover FBI lead (according to scuttlebutt) says that the website match.com is under investigation for being a front for an elaborate scam to extract money from unsuspecting women, and sometimes men too.

Using artificial intelligence and information harvested from social media, as well as banking information obtained through back channels, Match.com has become the ultimate scam website that targets older men and women (boomers) that are desperate to find "love."

The scam determines which Match.com members rate high on the gullibility scale, have money, are religious (this is a big one), and how desperate they are. Women are targeted most often, especially women who are recently widowed and have received life insurance payout, or recently divorced and have gained money through settlement.

What makes the scam so potent, is that most of the time people are meeting other real people and finding real relationships. This provides the perfect cover story for the website owners, allowing them to claim full denial of any knowledge, as well as putting the responsibility on the members of the site to do their due diligence.

Locked and loaded.

People of faith are the easiest targets, as they will often pray for someone to come into their life. The next step is to introduce someone into their life. The person is not real on the other end, but often they are a business owner or financially independent (not real) and often use the story that they are looking to retire and settle down, and have been alone for a long time since their spouse died. They will usually have a "child" that is in university or completely tied up in something in another country, so that only brief texts or emails from the "child" are sent to the Match.com member, just enough to make the story believable. The fake match may also have a LinkedIn profile, but not a Facebook profile.

The next part of the story involves the fake match needing to leave the Country to China or some other foreign place because they need to finalize the sale of their business before they can settle down and finally meet the match.com member. The fake match may call the victim from a "payphone" during their "trip" to the foreign country, as a sign that they just wanted the victim to be sure they were thinking of them. They might even send flowers to the victim's address or fake jewelry.

At some point, the "match" will call the victim from a "hospital" in the foreign country, and say they are sick and fell ill. This is where the scam really starts, as the victim is now emotionally attached to the fake person, and believe that this is their last chance at happiness and love, and will do anything for the fake person.

The fake person will send emails of faked documents of their "business" dealings, and reveal that their "business" is worth tens of millions of dollars. They will tell the victim that there is one final business deal that needs to be secured before they can sell the business, but the victim just needs to send money to the fake person's accountant. The fake person tells the victim that their bank accounts were locked out back home, otherwise they'd be able to pay to finalize the contract.

The victim, believing that "God" has sent this person into their life, gladly sends tens of thousands of dollars to the local bank account, having faith that their "god" is directing them to do so. The fake person then tells the victim that they are sending a parcel to them via courier with the money to pay the victim back, but before the package arrives the victim is informed by the "hospital" that the fake person has passed away.

This scam seems incredibly real to the victim, because they put their trust in their "god" and believed that their "god" sent such a wonderful person into their life. Sometimes the victim is then scammed again by the "child" of the fake person later, if its believed the victim still has more money. The scam can continue long after the fake match "died." The victim may also be contacted by the "courier" saying that they are trying to deliver the parcel to them, but they need money to get into the country because they were held up at the border. The scam will then continue for the victim as they are desperate to get their money back, and want that parcel.


The scam that was just outlined is one of many that Match.com and possibly other matchmaking websites are complicit in. How money is extracted from the victim will differ from victim to victim. Some scores are all in one shot, other scams extract part of someone's paycheck every two weeks to launder money for terrorism or other organized crime.

We strongly urge anyone looking for a relationship to avoid these websites if there is a chance you could be scammed. People often start looking for a relationship after coming into money, and they are the prime targets in most cases for Match.com scams.

The information provided in this post is from sources unknown. We cannot post this information on social media for reasons we won't specify. please share this post and help stop scammers. As for Match.com and the owners of this website, they may or may not already be under arrest, depending on how complete the investigation into their crime ring is. Rest assured, if you are scammed, your money is gone.

Be careful out there. We'll see you soon.

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